Berean Studies / Ber04 - Temperance And Self-Control

(Use your Browser's "Find" or "Search" option to search within this page)


Single Click a triangle below to see the references CT Russell selected for the associated question. The study questions (with the references) are also included as an attached Adobe PDF file at the bottom of this page.

Hide details for 1. What is the importance of self-control?1. What is the importance of self-control?
Pr 25:28; 16:32; E112 1; R2878 col. 1 1, 2;
R2892, Subhead: FOR THE VICTORS ARE THE REWARDS

(Pro 25:28) He that hath no rule over his own spirit is like a city that is broken down, and without walls.

(Pro 16:32) He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city.

E112:1
One of the chief battles of those who walk this narrow way is against self-will; to bring their wills into fullest subjection to the Heavenly Father's will, and to keep them there; to rule their own hearts, crushing out the rising ambitions which are natural even to a perfect manhood; quenching these kindling fires, and presenting their bodies and all earthly interests living sacrifices in the service of the Lord and his cause. These were the trials in which our Captain gained his victory and its laurels, and these also are the trials of his "brethren." "Greater is he that ruleth his own spirit [bringing it into full subordination to the will of God] than he that taketh a city:" greater also is such than he who, with a false conception of faith, would leap from the pinnacle of a temple, or do some other foolhardy thing. True faith in God consists not in blind credulity and extravagant assumptions respecting his providential care: it consists, on the contrary, of a quiet confidence in all the exceeding great and precious promises which God has made, a confidence which enables the faithful to resist the various efforts of the world, the flesh and the devil, to distract his attention, and which follows carefully the lines of faith and obedience marked out for us in the divine Word.

R2878 c1 p1,2
FIGHTING THE GOOD FIGHT OF FAITH.--`1 TIM. 6:12`.
How, then, and against what shall we exercise our combativeness, that it may be well directed to the Lord's pleasement and in the service of his cause? We answer, that our combativeness is to be turned against sin, and that its first exercise must begin with ourselves: the battle with self is the greatest battle, and we have the Lord's Word for it that he that "ruleth his spirit (his own mind, will) is better than he that taketh a city," because he has to that extent learned to exercise the combativeness of a true character in the right direction, in self-control. It is after we have had considerable experience in battling with sin and selfishness in ourselves, in casting the beam out of our own eyes, in subduing anger, malice, hatred and strife in our own hearts and flesh--it is then, and by means of this severe battle and experience, that we will be prepared to assist the brethren, and to assist our neighbors in their difficulties--to help them to overcome their besetments and weaknesses.
Whoever starts out by fighting even the sins of others before he has made a vigorous campaign against his own weaknesses and errors, is making a mistake. He needs humility and sympathy to assist the others to fight their battles, and this he cannot gain without first battling with himself and learning to appreciate how strong is the foe to be contended with, and how thoroughly entrenched is sin and selfishness in all the avenues of the flesh. He even needs to be worsted in some of his battles with self in order to have a clear appreciation of his own inability to overcome and to force him to go to the throne of the heavenly grace to obtain mercy and find grace to help. He needs this because, as the Apostle says, it is when we are weak that we are strong; and when we are strong in our self-confidence, and therefore neglect to go to the Lord, then we are weak and liable to make failure in the battle, and to be overcome by the enemy--Sin.--`Heb. 4:16`; `2 Cor. 12:10`.

R2892, Subhead: for the victors are the rewards
Some may feel that if they thus sifted and tested and rejected all the untrue, the unworthy, the unjust, the impure and the unamiable thoughts presenting themselves, that they would have no topic left whereon to engage their minds, and this we believe would be true with a great many--their minds for a time would be quite vacant of thoughts, if all the evil and improper ones were rejected, banished; but by the time they would be in this attitude they would have such a "hunger and thirst after righteousness," truth, things lovely, things pure, things noble, that they would be in the right condition to receive the very spiritual food which the Lord has provided for them. There is one thing, and one thing only, which fully combines all of the above propositions, and demonstrates itself to be the one thing true, honorable, just, pure, lovely,--and that is, the divine character and plan. Let us think upon its various features. Let us study the divine Word and behold through it, as a telescope, the beauty of the divine character, the splendor of the divine plan, as revealed in God's Word and plan...whose length and breadth and height and depth no man can measure, and only the saints can comprehend by the holy spirit, and that in proportion as they receive of the holy spirit, the holy mind, the holy thoughts, replacing and displacing the unholy thoughts and sentiments of the natural man. (`Eph. 3:18`.) What a splendid premium the Lord thus places upon the study of his Word in the esteem of all who are of the class addressed by the Apostle in our text!
Such a ruling of the mind is a conquest; such a self-mastery is a victory; the greatest victory that can be gained. As the Scriptures declare, "He that ruleth his spirit [mind] is better than he that taketh a city." (`Prov. 16:32`.) And the prescription given by the Apostle in our text, for the mental health of the saints, is the very soul-discipline necessary to our development in character, to the degree pleasing to God and acceptable, through Christ Jesus our Lord. These are the victors to whom will be granted a share in the Kingdom. Ah, then, as the Apostle exhorts, "Let us lay aside every weight, and the sin that doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race set before us, looking unto Jesus, the author of our faith" until he shall have become the finisher of it (`Heb. 12:1,2`); remembering that he who is on our part, and who has engaged to help us and to carry us through every difficulty, and to fully instruct us if we submit ourselves to him, and thus to "make us meet for the inheritance of the saints in light," is Jesus, --who loved us and bought us with his own precious blood.
Well do the Scriptures generally enforce the importance of guarding the mind, the will, the heart, saying, "Keep thy heart with all diligence, for out of it are the issues of life." Keeping it, to the saints now called and in the race, means life more abundant, with glory, honor and immortality. Neglecting it, refusing to exercise self-control, means the permission of selfish desires to be conceived in our brains, and to lead away from the Lord and his "narrow way" on toward sin, on toward the wages of sin-- death--Second Death.

Show details for 2. Is self-control necessary in the interest of others?2. Is self-control necessary in the interest of others?

Show details for 3. Are we to be ‘temperate in all things’?3. Are we to be ‘temperate in all things’?

Show details for 4. Does self-control imply purification of the thoughts and intents of the heart?4. Does self-control imply purification of the thoughts and intents of the heart?

Show details for 5. Does temperance or self-control apply to our language?5. Does temperance or self-control apply to our language?

Show details for 6. Does self-control extend to business affairs?6. Does self-control extend to business affairs?

Show details for 7. Why is temperance necessary in our eating and drinking?7. Why is temperance necessary in our eating and drinking?

Show details for 8. Should we be temperate in our joys as well as in our sorrows?8. Should we be temperate in our joys as well as in our sorrows?

Show details for 9. Is it possible to be intemperate in studying the Scriptures and in attending religious meetings?9. Is it possible to be intemperate in studying the Scriptures and in attending religious meetings?

Show details for 10. What is the relation of the ‘new will’ toward the control of the flesh?10. What is the relation of the ‘new will’ toward the control of the flesh?

Show details for 11. What is the duty of the Church toward those ‘new creatures’ who are lacking in self-control?11. What is the duty of the Church toward those ‘new creatures’ who are lacking in self-control?

Show details for 12. Why is self-control an essential qualification in an Elder ?12. Why is self-control an essential qualification in an Elder ?

Show details for 13. Why is it important that parents exercise self-control?13. Why is it important that parents exercise self-control?

Show details for 14. How can suggestion be applied in teaching children self-control?14. How can suggestion be applied in teaching children self-control?

Show details for 15. How can we cultivate self-control?15. How can we cultivate self-control?

Show details for 16. What other most important grace will naturally be developed by attaining a large measure of self-control?16. What other most important grace will naturally be developed by attaining a large measure of self-control?

TEMPERANCE.pdf