Berean Studies / Ber06 - Brotherly Kindness (Brotherly Love)

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Single Click a triangle below to see the references CT Russell selected for the associated question. The study questions (with the references) are also included as an attached Adobe PDF file at the bottom of this page.

Show details for 1. What is the ‘new commandment’ given by Christ to his disciples?1. What is the ‘new commandment’ given by Christ to his disciples?

Show details for 2. What is brotherly love?2. What is brotherly love?

Show details for 3. Who are our ‘brethren’?3. Who are our ‘brethren’?

Show details for 4. Why is the manifestation of brotherly kindness so necessary ?4. Why is the manifestation of brotherly kindness so necessary ?

Show details for 5. Is it important that we observe the spirit as well as the form of our Lord's command?5. Is it important that we observe the spirit as well as the form of our Lord's command?

Show details for 6. Why do the Lord’s ‘brethren’ need no ‘outward passwords, grips or badges’?6. Why do the Lord’s ‘brethren’ need no ‘outward passwords, grips or badges’?

Show details for 7. How is our love for God measured by our love for ‘the brethren’?7. How is our love for God measured by our love for ‘the brethren’?

Show details for 8. Can we fellowship all ‘the brethren’ alike?8. Can we fellowship all ‘the brethren’ alike?

Show details for 9. Should we always expect to have our manifestations of brotherly kindness received in the same spirit?9. Should we always expect to have our manifestations of brotherly kindness received in the same spirit?

Show details for 10. How are the comfort and peace of the Church dependent upon the manifestation of this grace?10. How are the comfort and peace of the Church dependent upon the manifestation of this grace?

Show details for 11. How should brotherly love exercise itself in seeking opportunities for service?11. How should brotherly love exercise itself in seeking opportunities for service?

Show details for 12. How should brotherly love manifest itself ‘in honor preferring one another’?12. How should brotherly love manifest itself ‘in honor preferring one another’?

Show details for 13. How should we ‘consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works’?13. How should we ‘consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works’?

Show details for 14. How will brotherly love exercise itself in ‘laying down our lives for the brethren’?14. How will brotherly love exercise itself in ‘laying down our lives for the brethren’?

Show details for 15. How should we manifest brotherly kindness toward the weaker brethren?15. How should we manifest brotherly kindness toward the weaker brethren?

Show details for 16. How will brotherly love sympathize with the more demonstrative brethren?16. How will brotherly love sympathize with the more demonstrative brethren?

Show details for 17. How should brotherly kindness deal with the self-seeking ?17. How should brotherly kindness deal with the self-seeking ?

Show details for 18. How will brotherly kindness deal with brethren who lack self- control?18. How will brotherly kindness deal with brethren who lack self- control?

Show details for 19. How should brotherly kindness seek to avoid ‘busy- bodying’?19. How should brotherly kindness seek to avoid ‘busy- bodying’?

Show details for 20. How should brotherly love control the tongue?20. How should brotherly love control the tongue?

Show details for 21. How should brotherly love treat a slanderous report against an elder or other brethren?21. How should brotherly love treat a slanderous report against an elder or other brethren?

Show details for 22. How should the Church exercise brotherly kindness toward those who ‘walk disorderly’?22. How should the Church exercise brotherly kindness toward those who ‘walk disorderly’?

Hide details for 23. How should the elders exercise brotherly love in reproving the ‘unruly’?23. How should the elders exercise brotherly love in reproving the ‘unruly’?
R3211 col. 1 3; F300, 301

R3211 [col. 1 3]:
"Reprove, rebuke, exhort, with all long-suffering and doctrine." This part of the exhortation is not alike applicable to all; too many feel at liberty to reprove and to rebuke. Doubtless many need reproofs and many need rebukes, but how few are able to administer these to profit and not to injury! The Apostle addressed these words in a particular sense to Timothy as an experienced elder in the Church of Christ, and to some extent an overseer amongst the elders. It would be a great mistake to apply these words in general, and for each of the Lord's people to see to what extent he could administer reproofs and rebukes to his brethren. Rather should sympathy go out to such an extent that reproofs and rebukes would be avoided, except as duty, because of responsibility in the Church of God, should necessitate this. Even so experienced an elder and overseer as Timothy must see to it that his reproving and rebuking and exhorting should be done with all longsuffering--with patience, gentleness and forbearance, and with doctrine (2 Tim. 4:2); showing clearly wherein the principles of righteousness were infringed and pointing out distinctly the Word of the Lord concerning the same. This duty still rests upon those who occupy places of prominence in the Church to which they have in the Lord's providence been appointed; and in proportion as they are filled with the Lord's spirit of love and gentleness and meekness and patience and forbearance, they will strive to perform this delicate and unpleasant business of reproving and rebuking, where necessary, in most modest language and under the most favorable conditions.

F300 through F301--Admonishing Not a General Order
It would be a great mistake, however, to suppose that the Apostle, in using this general language to the Church, meant that every individual of the Church was to do such admonishing. To admonish wisely, helpfully, is a very delicate matter indeed, and remarkably few have a talent for it. The election of elders on the part of congregations is understood to signify the election of those of the number possessed of the largest measure of spiritual development, combined with natural qualifications to constitute them the representatives of the congregation, not only in respect to the leading of meetings, etc., but also in respect to keeping order in the meetings and admonishing unruly ones wisely, kindly, firmly. That this is the Apostle's thought is clearly shown in the two preceding verses, in which he says:

"We beseech you, brethren, to know them which labor among you, and are over you in the Lord, and admonish you; and to esteem them very highly in love for their works' sake. And be at peace amongst yourselves." 1 Thess. 5:12,13

If divine wisdom has been properly sought and properly exercised in the choosing of elders of a congregation, it follows that those thus chosen were very highly esteemed; and since novices are not to be chosen, it follows that these were appreciated and selected for their works' sake, because it was discerned by the brethren that they had a considerable measure of the holy spirit of love and wisdom and meekness, besides certain natural gifts and qualifications for this service. To "be at peace amongst yourselves," as the Apostle exhorts, would mean that, having chosen these elders to be the representatives of the congregation, the body in general would look to them to perform the service to which they were chosen, and would not attempt to take it each upon himself to be a reprover, or admonisher, etc. Indeed, as we have already seen, the Lord's people are not to judge one another personally; and only the congregation as a whole may exclude one of the number from the fellowship and privileges of the meeting. And this, we have seen, can come only after the various steps of a more private kind have been taken--after all efforts to bring about reform have proved unavailing, and the interests of the Church in general are seriously threatened by the wrong course of the offender. But in the text before us the Apostle exhorts that the congregation shall "know"--that is, recognize, look to-- those whom they have chosen as their representatives, and expect them to keep guard over the interests of the Church, and to do the admonishing of the unruly, up to the point where matters would be serious enough to bring them before the Church as a court.

Show details for 24. How may we avoid judging one another as individuals ?24. How may we avoid judging one another as individuals ?

Show details for 25. How should brotherly kindness be exercised toward brethren who have doctrinal ‘hobbies’?25. How should brotherly kindness be exercised toward brethren who have doctrinal ‘hobbies’?

Show details for 26. What is the relation between brotherly kindness and ‘the unity of the faith’?26. What is the relation between brotherly kindness and ‘the unity of the faith’?

Show details for 27. How should brotherly kindness deal with serious offenders in the Church?27. How should brotherly kindness deal with serious offenders in the Church?

Hide details for 28. By what rules are ‘false brethren’ to be judged?28. By what rules are ‘false brethren’ to be judged?
See Topical Index of Watch Tower Bible , under ‘ Brethren .’

Show details for 29. What should be our attitude toward ‘siftings’ among the brethren?29. What should be our attitude toward ‘siftings’ among the brethren?

Show details for 30. What should be the attitude of all ‘true sacrificers’ toward each other and toward those who have left 30. What should be the attitude of all ‘true sacrificers’ toward each other and toward those who have left ‘the Holy’?

Show details for 31. How does brotherly kindness apply ‘the Golden Rule’?31. How does brotherly kindness apply ‘the Golden Rule’?

Show details for 32. How should brotherly love exercise itself toward the special servants of the Church?32. How should brotherly love exercise itself toward the special servants of the Church?

Show details for 33. How should we exercise brotherly love toward our brethren still ‘in Babylon’?33. How should we exercise brotherly love toward our brethren still ‘in Babylon’?

Show details for 34. How should brotherly kindness consider ‘social obligations’?34. How should brotherly kindness consider ‘social obligations’?

Show details for 35. What course will brotherly love dictate in the matter of ‘borrowing and lending’?35. What course will brotherly love dictate in the matter of ‘borrowing and lending’?

Hide details for 36. How should brotherly love regard visiting, ‘borrowing a neighbor’s time ‘?36. How should brotherly love regard visiting, ‘borrowing a neighbor’s time ‘?
F570 1 to 572

F570 [1] through F572:
While considering this subject we might mention another, closely related to it in a general way, viz., the habit of some of considering themselves at liberty to intrude upon their friends as visitors--borrowing the neighbor's time. It is a part of the generous spirit of love to be hospitable, and all of the Lord's people should cultivate this disposition on every suitable occasion, as one that is pleasing to the Lord and that will be helpful to their own spiritual growth. (Heb. 13:2) They should be pleased to entertain friends, neighbors, for a meal or for a night, etc., as their circumstances may permit: a heart desire to entertain should always be present, whether opportunity for the exercise of that desire be found or not. Hospitality does not signify lavish expenditure beyond one's means, nor that better should be provided for a guest than for one's own family. It does signify, however, a willingness to share such things as we have with others.

But let us look at the other side of the question. The Lord's consecrated people of the New Creation should never be intruders. They should be sure that they have a positive invitation and welcome before they accept hospitalities for a meal or for a night. How beautiful an illustration of this proper principle we have in the case of our Lord, walking with the two disciples to Emmaus! It was his desire to go with them into their home, and to share their evening meal, that he might confer additional blessing upon them. Nevertheless, when they reached their home, "he made as though he would go further," and waited until they had urged, or constrained him, before he consented to tarry with them. This was not a deception, nor would it be deceptive on our part to do similarly. Our Lord would not have remained with them unless they had urged him to do so, nor should we stay with any except such as give us a hearty welcome, nor remain longer than the hearty welcome might continue, whatever our circumstances.

The idea which seems to prevail in the minds of some, that they are at liberty to "sit down upon" natural relatives or spiritual relatives, is a great mistake. No such right prevails. We have the right to give and to be generous, but are not authorized to request or require such things from others. They have the right to give or to withhold that which is their own, that of which they are stewards. As to how much the New Creatures should permit themselves to be imposed upon by mistaken brethren or relatives after the flesh would depend upon circumstances, largely upon the physical and financial conditions of the visitor. However, in justice to himself, and in justice also to the visitor who has the unsound mind upon this question, and who purposes to make his visit a visitation, the entertainer should kindly but plainly say--"I ought perhaps to tell you that it will not be convenient for me to have you with us longer than___"; or another good way in dealing with such people is to tell them at the beginning of their visit that it will be convenient to have them until a certain date, or to invite them definitely for a meal or a day or a week, as the case may be--indicating clearly the extent of the invitation and not leaving it to conjecture. Such a course seems absolutely necessary in the interest of the home, the family purse, one's own time, the Lord's service, etc., as well as proper and helpful to the large number of people who have unsound judgments along this line. But it is not necessary for us either to think or speak unkindly to or of these. They may perhaps have fallen more in this particular than we or some others, and we perhaps by nature were more fallen than they in other particulars. In any event we should think kindly, generously, respecting them, and all the more resolve that we ourselves will most thoroughly avoid the objectionable course.

Show details for 37. What is the relation between brotherly love and communism?37. What is the relation between brotherly love and communism?

Hide details for 38. Do those who have reached ‘the mark’ still have trials along the line of brotherly love?38. Do those who have reached ‘the mark’ still have trials along the line of brotherly love?
F190 1, 2

F190 [1, 2]:
We must reach this climax of love before we can be counted worthy of a place in the New Creation, and we are not to expect that each one of the Lord's followers will reach this mark just at the moment of expiring in death. Quite the contrary. We are to expect to reach it as early as possible in our Christian experience, and then to remember the words of the Apostle, "Having done all-- Stand!" (Eph. 6:13) We require testings in love after we have reached the mark; and our exercises while at the mark--striving to maintain in our lives that mark, or standard--will be very strengthening to our characters. In this, especially, our experiences will correspond to those of our Lord; for while he did not need to run to attain the mark, he did need to fight a good fight of faith at the mark--not to be turned from it, not to be overcome by the various besetments of the world and the Adversary. "I press down upon the mark," says the Apostle; and so must each of us hold fast that mark after we do attain it, and see to it that in all the testings which the Lord permits to come upon us we shall be accounted of him as overcomers--not in our own strength, but in the strength of our Redeemer's assistance.

Besetments will come against us to turn us from the perfect love toward the Father, to induce us to consent to render less than the full homage and obedience due to him. Temptations will come to us in respect to the brethren also, to suggest that we do not permit love for the brethren to cover a multitude of faults-- suggestions that we become provoked with those whom we have learned to love and appreciate, and with whose weaknesses we have learned to sympathize. Besetments will come against us in respect to our enemies, after we have learned to love them--suggesting to us that there are exceptional cases and that our magnanimity toward them should have its limitations. Blessed are we if in these temptations we hold fast, bearing down upon the mark, striving to retain that position which we have already attained--fighting the good fight of faith --holding firmly to the eternal life which is counted ours through Jesus.

Show details for 39. Why is brotherly love ‘one of the final and most searching tests ‘ of the brethren and how may we prepar39. Why is brotherly love ‘one of the final and most searching tests ‘ of the brethren and how may we prepare to meet it?

Show details for 40. What should be ‘the main- spring back of brotherly kindness’?40. What should be ‘the main- spring back of brotherly kindness’?

Show details for 41. What does the illustration of ‘the third- quarter mark’ signify?41. What does the illustration of ‘the third- quarter mark’ signify?

Show details for 42. Why is it important that we manifest brotherly love now ?42. Why is it important that we manifest brotherly love now ?

Show details for 43. How may we become members of ‘the Mary class’?43. How may we become members of ‘the Mary class’?

Hide details for 44. How did Jesus show us a grand example of brotherly love and sympathy?44. How did Jesus show us a grand example of brotherly love and sympathy?
R3434 col. 1 7; col. 2 1; R2807 col. 2 13 (last) ‘So far as ... ‘

R3434 [col. 1 7 through col. 2 1]:
All this means that our Lord Jesus was a Comforter in Zion above and beyond all other comforters. He entered into sympathy with the meek and lowly and right-intentioned in all of their weaknesses and trials and difficulties; and this is the hold that the character and words of Jesus have to-day upon our hearts, and also upon the hearts of many who are not his people in the full consecrated sense. It was not by continually chiding the apostles, and accusing them, but because, instead, our Lord sympathized with them, assisted them, and interpreted their heart-intentions liberally, generously, that they became more and more his faithful followers, even unto death. Note the case of the woman taken in sin, and our Lord's failure to make any pharisaical tirade against her. Mark his reproof to those who stood by: "He that is without sin, let him cast the first stone." Mark how, when they were all thus convicted of imperfection in some particular themselves, our Lord said to the woman, "Neither do I condemn thee; go and sin no more." (`John 8:3-11`.) Notice his dealing with the Apostle Peter, after he had denied him, cursing and swearing. Many of the Lord's followers, if in his stead, would have felt it their bounden duty to rebuke Peter publicly before all the apostles, and to have required public confession and some sort of penance; and on every possible occasion afterward to have thrown in his face his weakness and disloyalty. Such have not rightly interpreted and copied the Lord's spirit, and hence are not sons and daughters of consolation in the Church. They are, on the contrary, strife-breeders, vexatious hinderers of the work they desire to forward. They should hear the Master's voice, "Take my yoke upon you and learn of me." In proportion as we learn of the Lord we become, not mouthpieces for the Law merely, but mouthpieces specially for mercy and love and helpfulness and comfort.

So far as the record shows, our Lord did not once mention to Peter either his profanity or his disloyalty. Peter knew about these without being told; he had already wept over them; a mere word from the Lord in chiding, reproof, might have discouraged him,-- perhaps hopelessly. The nearest thing to a reproof in our Lord's conduct and language was the inquiry, "Lovest thou me?" Let all who would be true sons and daughters of consolation in Zion learn this lesson from the great Teacher--not to strive to punish and correct and reprove and rebuke; but to avoid these so far as possible, and to inquire, not so much about the past as about the present--What is the offender's present attitude toward the Lord and toward his flock?

R2807 [col. 2 14]:
So far as the record shows these questions respecting his present love were the only reproof our Lord gave Peter on account of his temporary deflection and denial of his cause; and here we have a lesson which many of the Lord's people will do well to lay closely to heart. Many feel as tho they must exact from a brother or a sister a very decided apology for any act of discourtesy, even tho much less important than Peter's misdeed. Let us learn well this lesson of reproving others very gently, very considerately, kindly, by a hint rather than by a direct charge and detail of the wrong--by an enquiry respecting the present condition of their hearts, rather than respecting a former condition, in which we know that they have erred. We are to be less careful for the punishments that will follow wrongdoings than for the recovery of the erring one out of the error of his way. We are not to attempt to judge and to punish one another for misdeeds, but rather to remember that all this is in the hands of the Lord; --we are not in any sense of the word to avenge ourselves or to give a chastisement or recompense for evil. This is not to be understood as annulling parental obligation to judging and chastening children; tho the principle of love is to have full control there also, to the extent of our judgment. We are to have kindness, love and benevolence toward all, especially toward those who are followers of Jesus. As for Peter and his denial of the Lord, and as to the offences which may come to us through brethren, we may know that under divine providence some corrective penalty or discipline, direct or indirect, always follows; but we are not to attempt to inflict those penalties, nor to impress a condemnation, upon those who are in error and who realize their error, but rather to sympathize with them wisely, by helping them to learn the good lessons.

Show details for 45. How can we fulfill Jesus’ command to ‘wash one another’s feet’?45. How can we fulfill Jesus’ command to ‘wash one another’s feet’?

Show details for 46. How jealously should we guard and increase this grace of brotherly kindness?46. How jealously should we guard and increase this grace of brotherly kindness?

Show details for 47. How may we cultivate brotherly love?47. How may we cultivate brotherly love?

48. What additional thoughts are found in Topical Index of ‘Heavenly Manna, ‘ under ‘Love One Another‘?


BROTHERLY_KINDNESS.pdf